In a recent Atlantic article entitled “There’s More to Life Than Freezing Your Eggs,” Dr. Su explains that the overall health of the mother is the determining factor in whether a woman who has frozen her eggs will be able to successfully become and remain pregnant.

“No matter how old the woman, whether they’ve had cancer or not,” said Dr. Su, “the chances of success of egg freezing and implementation and ultimately a viable pregnancy are about the overall health of the mother. It’s a bigger picture than just when and if you froze your eggs.” Regardless of the age of a woman’s eggs, those who get pregnant later in life have a higher risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, pelvic inflammation, placenta previa, miscarriage, and early delivery because of preeclampsia.

The article highlights the recent media attention egg freezing has been receiving (Sarah Elizabeth Richard’s recent Wall Street Journal article, “Why I Froze My Eggs (And You Should Too).”), and argues that it may not be the great gender equalizer that many women hope it will be.

Read the article here: There’s More to Life Than Freezing Your Eggs